The Culbert Family Genealogy Project:
 Connecting a Migratory People

Robert Beatty CULBERT

Robert Beatty CULBERT

Male 1850 - 1909  (59 years)

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  • Name Robert Beatty CULBERT  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Census 1850  New York City, New York, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Born 22 May 1850  New York City, New York, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Gender Male 
    Education Sep 1865  New York City, New York, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    School No. 14 
    Census 1870  Brooklyn Borough, Kings County, New York, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Census 1880  New York City, New York, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    Occupation 1880  New York City, New York, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    Salesman 
    Business Bef. 1877-1899  New York City, New York, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    Census 1900  South Orange, Essex County, New Jersey, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    Residence 1909  120 West 64th Street, New York City, New York, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  [14
    Died 26 Oct 1909  New York City, New York, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  [14
    Person ID I6439  Culbert | Branch: John Culbert (I8425), c.1785-1830, New York City, New York, U.S.A.
    Last Modified 11 May 2017 

    Father John William CULBERT, Sr.,   b. Abt. 1812, New York City, New York, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Aug 1881, Yonkers, Westchester County, New York, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 69 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Mother Charlotte Cornelia ARMSTRONG,   b. 16 Sep 1821, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 May 1907, Prob. New York City, New York, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Family ID F310  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Elizabeth A. CONOVER,   b. Abt 1855,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married Bef. 1880  Manhattan Borough, New York City, New York, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Divorced 1892  [15
    Last Modified 8 Dec 2016 
    Family ID F6729  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Leitza A. ?,   b. Abt 1855, New York, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married Bef. 1897  [16
    Last Modified 8 Dec 2016 
    Family ID F7530  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Elisabeth C. BECK,   b. Aug 1860, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Mar 1910, Prob. New York City, New York, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 49 years) 
    Married 29 Apr 1903  Manhattan Borough, New York City, New York, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location  [17
    Last Modified 3 Feb 2015 
    Family ID F5972  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsCensus - Ward 8 - 1850 - New York City, New York, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 22 May 1850 - New York City, New York, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEducation - School No. 14 - Sep 1865 - New York City, New York, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - Ward 4 - 1870 - Brooklyn Borough, Kings County, New York, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - Bef. 1880 - Manhattan Borough, New York City, New York, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1880 - New York City, New York, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Salesman - 1880 - New York City, New York, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBusiness - Culbert & Co. and later Thompson, Culbert & Co., liquor business - Bef. 1877-1899 - New York City, New York, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1900 - South Orange, Essex County, New Jersey, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 29 Apr 1903 - Manhattan Borough, New York City, New York, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1909 - 120 West 64th Street, New York City, New York, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 26 Oct 1909 - New York City, New York, U.S.A. Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • News 2 news

  • Notes 
    • I, Robert B. Culbert, a native and loyal citizen of the United States hereby apply to the Legation of the United States at London for a passport for myself. I solemnly swear that I was born at New York City in the State of New York on or about the 22 day of May, 1850; that my father was a native citizen of the United States; that I am domiciled in the United States, my permanent residence being at New York City in the State of New York, where I follow the occupation of Merchant; that I left the United States on the 16 day of April, 1890, and am now temporarily sojourning at Hotel Victoria, London; that I intend to return to the United States within a year with the purpose of residing and performing the duties of citizenship therein; and that I desire the passport for the purpose of travelling on the continent.
      39 Years Old, 5 Feet 10 inches
      High Forehead, Grey Eyes
      Regular Nose
      Moustached Mouth, Square Chin
      Brown Hair, Complexion: Healthy
      Face: Oval [18]
    • Appeal from trial term, New York county.
      Action for fraud by William A. Taylor against Robert H. Thompson and another. From a judgment in favor of the plaintiff, and from an order denying a new trial, the defendants appeal. Reversed.
      In this action it is attempted to charge the defendants for damages sustained by the plaintiff through misrepresentations alleged to have been made by the firm of Thompson, Culbert & Co., by which misrepresentations the plaintiff was induced to purchase the firm’s business. The complaint alleges that an agreement was entered into on October 4, 1889, between Thompson, Culbert & Co. (a firm composed of John Thompson, R. H. Thompson, H. D. Norris, and Robert Culbert) and the plaintiff and the defendant Robert Culbert, whereby the former sold to the latter, in consideration of $26,000 and the payment of outstanding indebtedness, all the assets and property of the firm; and that the plaintiff paid to the firm $26,000, and, to meet the indebtedness, the further sum of $51,520.75, upon its representations that the net cost of merchandise on hand was $71,757.19, the collectible bills receivable $43,599.67, and the outstanding loans and notes $51,520.75, and the liabilities for purchases $37,428.96, which representations were untrue. The answer of the defendants R. H. Thompson and H. D. Norris denies that they ever made or authorized any representations as claimed, and alleges that, in addition to the agreement stated in the complaint, an additional agreement was made at the same time, whereby the firm of Thompson, Culbert & Co. was dissolved, and its assets sold to Culbert, who thereupon entered into a partnership with the plaintiff.
      Upon the trial the issues were narrowed down to the question of the defendants’ liability for any representation made by Culbert to the plaintiff, and the nature of the representations made regarding the cost of the stock on hand at the time of the sale, the bills receivable, and the liability existing for purchases of merchandise. The defendants’ undisputed testimony is that the three members of the firm of Thompson, Culbert & Co., other than Culbert, had contributed the capital, while he was the active manager, and most familiar with its business status; that not long before the sale the firm had suffered a loss of some $30,000, through the defalcation of its clerks, with the result that a dissolution was proposed; that Culbert expressed his desire to retain the business, and set about obtaining the requisite capital; that he consulted his friend Mr. Bonner, who introduced the plaintiff to him, and agreed to loan the money necessary, provided the plaintiff entered upon the
      venture. The plaintiff testified that he sought Mr. Culbert, who said he was the practical man of the firm, and his partners “were willing to get out of the business if he could get sufficient money”; that they had about $51,000 borrowed money on notes, and if they paid that money, and assumed the outstanding firm’s accounts, which he said were $37,000, “we could get the business – purchase the business”; that Culbert said the bills receivable were about $43,000, and he knew them personally, and they were good as gold; that the cost of the stock was about $71,000, which he had himself figured. Plaintiff testified that he asked Culbert to make up a written statement, which he did, and presented to him and Mr. Bonner; that he then had an expert accountant, Mr. Uhler, examine the firm books, and his first report was less than Culbert had given, and he made a second report, which was the same as Culbert’s. This second report was put in evidence, Culbert’s report having been lost, and it contains the figures $37,428.96 as owing for purchases, $43,599.67 due for sales of merchandise, and $71,757.19 as the cost of stock. It concludes with the words: “An absolutely accurate statement cannot be made from the books in their present condition, but, in my opinion, the above is a conservative one. The probability is that the excess of assets, when determined, will be greater than here shown. J. Clement Uhler.” The plaintiff testified that, owing to Mr. Uhler’s presenting two different reports, he told Mr. Culbert that he would rely entirely upon what Mr. Culbert assured him and represented was the condition of affairs. Every facility was afforded Mr. Uhler, and the plaintiff had free access to all the firm’s books, had he desired to examine them. During the period of examination and negotiation he made no inquiries of any of the defendants except Culbert, although he frequently saw them. Mr. Thompson and Mr. Norris testified that they knew Mr. Culbert wished to continue the business, and had no money, and was endeavoring to get some one to purchase the interests of the other partners, and they heard that Mr. Bonner was to furnish the money, and only a very brief interval before the sale was made did they know that Taylor was to come in as a partner with Culbert. Mr. Bonner’s testimony was that Mr. Culbert said “he was afraid the firm was going to be dissolved, and he was going to be left out, unless he could in some way get capital to go in. It was a great thing, as he represented it, provided he could get capital, and go on and continue the business.” That he said he knew all the details, and was the only man that could compute the stock, and he was very sure that if he could get a partner he could go on. Upon the plaintiff’s approval of the enterprise and assumption of responsibility, Mr. Bonner advanced the necessary money.
      The sale was made on October 4th, at which time all the members of Thompson, Culbert & Co., the plaintiff, and the attorneys for both sides, Mr. Curtis and Mr. Monk, were present. According to the defendants, there was but one meeting on October 4th, but the plaintiff asserts that there had been a prior meeting, on October 2d, at which time he was informed that he was to pay $26,000 capital advanced by the members of Thompson, Culbert & Co. other than Culbert, who had put in no capital, as well as pay the sum of $42,520.75 on outstanding notes, and $10,000 due the National Bank of the Republic. Plaintiff finally agreed to pay all that was asked, except interest upon capital, and this claim was withdrawn, and thereupon two agreements were signed, - one the agreement of sale by all parties, and the other the agreement of dissolution by all except the plaintiff, he having not been a member of that firm. Mr. Monk, however, plaintiff’s attorney, was a witness to this paper as well as to the other. It was testified that both papers were discussed in the presence of all parties just before the execution. The agreement of sale states that it was “made and entered into at the city of New York by and between John Thompson, Robert B. Culbert, Robert H. Thompson, and Henry D. Norris, as members of the firm of Thompson, Culbert & Co., parties of the first part, and Robert B. Culbert and William A. Taylor, composing the firm of Culbert & Taylor, parties of the second part.” It was signed, not only by the members of both firms, but by the firms as well. The agreement of dissolution was made between the four partners, and recites that “whereas, the parties have consented to dissolve said firm, and to sell the assets, good will, and property thereof to
      Robert B. Culbert. Now, therefore, this indenture witnesseth that the parties hereto mutually agree *** that the assets,” etc., “shall be sold to Robert B. Culbert and William A. Tyalor upon condition that said Culbert and Tayor shall pay,” etc. Although the agreement of sale refers to the firm of Culbert & Taylor, this latter firm, it seems, was not then formed, the articles being drawn up later, and antedated to October 4th, and notes of the firm being given to Mr. Bonner for the money he had advanced with which the purchase was made, and similiarly antedated. These notes took the place of what the plaintiff had previously given Mr. Bonner. Mr. Robert H. Thompson testified that on October 4th, in the midst of the conference, something was said about the condition of the firm, and he said to the plaintiff: “Mr. Taylor, I want you to understand that so far as our side is concerned we know nothing about the value of this business, - the assets or anything else. Our dealing has been with Mr. Culbert. He has gone through the books, and examined the stock, and I presume he knows what he is buying. I want that distinctly understood.” On the first trial he testified that he said: “Mr. Taylor, I want you to understand one thing, that I recite here we know nothing whatever about the assets of this concern we have made. Our negotiations have been with Mr. Culbert, and he has gone over this whole affair, and I presume he knows what he is buying. We do not know whether there is $108,000 or $8,000 in the assets of this concern, nor does it make any difference to us. Our agreement is with Mr. Culbert. It is all understood, and we came here to settle it.” Mr. John Thompson and Mr. Norris and Mr. Curtis corroborate this testimony. Mr. Taylor and Mr. Monk denied that such words were said. On the other hand, Mr. Taylor asserts, as does Mr. Monk, that something was said at one of these interviews, either by John or Robert Thompson, to the effect that the accounts receivable were as good as gold, and, if desired, would be guarantied for 1 per cent.; that “the business was a good business, and ought to be a very good paying business,” and Mr. Taylor was getting more than he was paying. That these statements were made is denied. There is also a contradiction as to what occurred after the sale between the same parties. It being claimed that Mr. Taylor expressed himself as well pleased with the business, and successful, and that he knew all about it from his personal examinations. Mr. Taylor admits that for a long time he said nothing about Mr. Culbert’s misrepresentations, but avers that this was because of Mr. Bonner’s wishes.
      The evidence shows that the purchase amount, instead of amounting to $37,428.76, as stated, was $42,449.04, and the books themselves showed that $42,449.04 and not $37,428.76, was due from the firm. And it is undisputed that the bills receivable, which were supposed to stand for merchandise sold, included the item of $803.43 which was charged up against the clerks who had defaulted. As to the actual cost of the stock in hand, and what Culbert stated was the cost of that stock, there is no dispute but that there was the exact quantity, quality, and kind claimed, and that the exact sums which were used by Culbert as to cartage, freight, etc., in making up the cost as stated by him, do not appear in the books. Mr. Nora, an expert bookkeeper, who had been with Culbert & Taylor, testified that he had figured the net cost in substantially the same manner which Culbert said he did, employing general averages as to freight, etc., used in the trade. His figures were offered in evidence, and received over defendant’s objection and exception. He then testified in each instance what he found the actual cost to be, and the difference between his computation and that of Mr. Culbert, and further testified that when he came into the firm of Culbert & Taylor he was shown a cipher word used by them, the word being “Acornelius,” of which the successive letters stood for the figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0. There was then introduced in evidence a paper (Exhibit 24) containing a list of the various liquors, cipher marks beside them, and also figures; and it was testified that the figures were in Mr. Culbert’s writing, and that they were not correct translations of the cipher marks. Thus clarets mared “$EN” were quoted at $70, instead of $65, the exact translation of the cipher. In adding Mora’s figures and Mr. Culbert’s figures, and also the translations of the ciphers, the respective sums are $53,320.68, $71,757.19, and $65,005.43. In the items it appears that most of Mr. Culbert’s figures were greater than the cipher, some were the same, and
      one was less. A Mr. Pardessus testified that he had been bookkeeper for Thompson, Culbert & Co., and he had copied Exhibit 24 for Mr. Culbert, as he did not wish it in his writing, but Mr. Culbert added the code mark and the figures. The jury returned a verdict for the plaintiff in the sum of $16,271.35, and from the judgment thereupon entered, and from order denying motion for a new trial, the defendants Robert H. Thompson and Henry D. Norris appeal.
      Argued before HATCH, McLAUGHLIN, O’BRIEN, INGRAHAM, and LAUGHLIN, JJ.
      Albert Stickney, for appellants. Stephen H. Olin, for respondent.
      Judgment reversed, and a new trial granted, with costs to the appellants to abide the event. [19]

  • Sources 
    1. [S1313] International Genealogical Index ©, (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints), Marriage of Robert B. Culbert & Elisabeth C. Beck (1903), Extracted marriage record for the locality listed.

    2. [S1825] New York Port, Ship Images, 1851-1891.

    3. [S1828] New York Times, 13 Mar 1910, p. 11, Died, Culbert.
      See death record for wife, Elizabeth

    4. [S1828] New York Times, 28 Oct 1909, p. 9, Died, Culbert.
      See death record

    5. [S1963] Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897, Robert B. Culbert, age 35.

    6. [S00029] 1850 United States Federal Census, Microfilm Series M432., Ward 8, District 1, New York City, New York, f1933, Jno. C. Culbert household, 1850.
      See 1850 census notes

    7. [S4454] U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925, NARA Serial M1834, Emergency Passport Applications (Passports Issued Abroad), 1877-1907, 14 May 1890, No. 245, Robert B. Culbert.
      date and location

    8. [S2815] New York City Free Academy Sixteenth Annual Register, 1864-1865, Robert Beatty Culbert, 1865.
      Number: 76
      Examination Number: 128
      Age: 15 years 4 months
      School No.: 14
      Time in Grammar Schools: 3 years
      Parent Name: Jno. W. Culbert
      Parent Occupation: Merchant
      Parent Residence: 50th st. & 1st avenue

    9. [S105] 1870 United States Federal Census, Microfilm Series M593 & T132 (Minnesota)., Ward 4, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, f9, John Culbert household, 1870.
      See 1870 census notes

    10. [S111] 1880 United States Federal Census, Microfilm Series T9., District 295, New York City, New York, f119, 1880.
      See 1880 census notes

    11. [S1830] New York Tribune, 20 Nov 1897.
      See business notes

    12. [S2817] New York State Reporter, Vol. 103, Supplement Vol. 70, pp. 997-1000, Taylor v. Thompson, et. al. (Supreme Court Appellate Division, First Department, 14 Jun 1901), 23 May 1901-11 Jul 1901.
      See general notes and two advertisement images

    13. [S136] 1900 United States Federal Census, Microfilm Series T623., District 189, South orange, Essex County, new Jersey, f288, Elizabeth Beck household, 1900.
      See 1900 census notes

    14. [S1828] New York Times, p. 9, Died, Culbert, 28 Oct 1909.
      CULBERT.- Robert B., 120 West 64th St., Oct. 26, aged 60. Funeral private.

    15. [S449] Burstein, Jennifer Macy, Personal (I23977), 13 Dec 2013.

    16. [S1830] New York Tribune, 20 Nov 1897.
      See business notes for Robert

    17. [S1822] New York Marriages, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F6QL-35X, accessed 13 Dec 2013, Robt. B. Culbert and Elizabeth C. Beck, 29 Apr 1903.
      Groom: Robt. B. Culbert; Father: John W. Culbert; Mother: Charlotte C. Armstrong; Bride: Elizabeth C. Beck; Father: Alex Beck; Mother: Elizabeth Whiteside; Event Date: 29 Apr 1903; Event Place: Manhattan, New York, New York.

    18. [S2816] Emergency Passport Application Issued Abroad, 1887-1907, Vol. 82: England, 1890-1891, No. 245, Robert Beatty Culbert, 14 May 1890.
      See general notes

    19. [S2817] New York State Reporter, Vol. 103, Supplement Vol. 70, pp. 997-1000, Taylor v. Thompson, et. al. (Supreme Court Appellate Division, First Department, 14 Jun 1901), 23 May 1901-11 Jul 1901.
      See general notes